WHAT IS THIS BLOG ALL ABOUT?

On this blog you I am going to share my world with you. What can you expect to find here -- First of all lots of sexy men, off all shapes and types, something for everyone, as I can find beauty in most men. You are going to find that I have a special fondness for Vintage Beefcake and Porn of the 60's, 70's, and 80's. Also, I love the average guy, and if you want to see yourself on here, just let me know. Be as daring as you like, as long as you are of age, let me help you share it with the world! Also, you are going to find many of my points of views, on pop culture, politics and our changing world. Look to see posts about pop culture, politics, entertainment, sex, etc. There is not any subject that I find as something I won't discuss or offer my point of view. Most of all, I hope you are going to enjoy what I post. ENJOY!

Sunday, September 22, 2013

And the Emmy goes to...

Outstanding Drama Series
Breaking Bad 
AMC
Breaking Bad is an American television crime drama series created and produced by Vince Gilligan. Set and produced in Albuquerque, New Mexico, Breaking Bad is the story of Walter White (Bryan Cranston), a struggling high school chemistry teacher who is diagnosed with inoperable lung cancer at the beginning of the series. He turns to a life of crime, producing and selling methamphetamine in order to secure his family's financial future before he dies teaming with his former student, Jesse Pinkman (Aaron Paul). Heavily serialized, the series is known for positioning its characters in seemingly inextricable corners, and has been labeled a contemporary western by its creator.
Premiering on January 20, 2008, the series is broadcast in the United States and Canada on the cable channel AMC and is a production of Sony Pictures Television. On August 14, 2011, AMC announced that Breaking Bad had been renewed for a fifth and final season consisting of 16 episodes. This final season is split into two parts, each consisting of 8 episodes and broadcast over the course of two years. The first half premiered on July 15, 2012, and concluded on September 2, 2012; the second half premiered on August 11, 2013. The series finale is scheduled to air on September 29, 2013.
Breaking Bad has received widespread critical acclaim and is considered one of the greatest TV dramas of all time. Progression of each season resulted in extremely positive word-of-mouth, which has led to a steady increase in popularity. This culminated in rapid growth because of recent availability on multiple platforms, such as Netflix. Breaking Bad is now among the most-watched cable shows on American television, the audience numbers having doubled from the previous year's episodes
The series has won ten Primetime Emmy Awards—including three consecutive wins for Best Actor for Cranston, two wins for Best Supporting Actor for Paul and one win for Best Supporting Actress for Gunn and Outstanding Drama Series after four nominations. The series was also nominated for an Golden Globe Award for Best Television Series – Drama and Cranston three times for Best Actor, besides being nominated four times for a Screen Actors Guild Award for Best Actor, winning once at the 19th Screen Actors Guild Awards. In 2013, the Writers Guild of America named Breaking Bad the 13th best-written TV series of all time. That same year, Guinness World Records awarded it the highest-rated TV series of all time, citing a Metacritic score of 99/100.
Starring
Bryan Cranston
Anna Gunn
Aaron Paul
Dean Norris
Betsy Brandt
RJ Mitte
Bob Odenkirk
Giancarlo Esposito
Jonathan Banks
Laura Fraser
Jesse Plemons

And the Emmy goes to...

Outstanding Comedy Series
Modern Family 
ABC
Modern Family is an American comedy series which debuted on ABC on September 23, 2009. Presented in mockumentary style, the fictional characters frequently talk directly into the camera. The program tells of Jay Pritchett, his second wife, their infant son and his stepson, and his two children and their families. Christopher Lloyd and Steven Levitan conceived the series while sharing stories of their own "modern families".
The series premiered to critical acclaim and was watched by 12.6 million viewers. Early on, it was named as a key holder for the 62nd Primetime Emmy Awards. Soon after, on October 8, 2009, the series was picked up for a full season. The series has received positive reviews from critics and received several award nominations. The series has won the Emmy Award for Outstanding Comedy Series in each of the past three years and the Emmy Award for Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series three times so far as well, twice for Eric Stonestreet and once for Ty Burrell, as well as the Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series twice for Julie Bowen. It also won the Golden Globe Award for Best Television Series – Musical or Comedy.
The syndication rights to the show have also been sold to USA Network and 10 Fox affiliates for a fall 2013 premiere. The success of the show has also led it to being the tenth-highest revenue-generating show for 2012, earning $2.13 million an episode. Brian Lowry, of Variety, sums up the show in regards to the airing of the pilot episode: "Flitting among three storylines, it's smart, nimble and best of all, funny, while actually making a point about the evolving nature of what constitutes 'family'".
On May 10, 2013, Modern Family was renewed for a fifth season, which is scheduled to premiere on September 25, 2013.

And the Emmy goes to...

Outstanding Miniseries or Movie
Behind the Candelabra 
HBO
Behind the Candelabra is a 2013 American drama film directed by Steven Soderbergh about the last ten years in the life of pianist Liberace and the secret affair he had with the younger Scott Thorson, based on Thorson’s memoir, Behind the Candelabra: My Life with Liberace (1988). Richard LaGravenese wrote the screenplay. Jerry Weintraub was the executive producer. It premiered at the 2013 Cannes Film Festival on May 21, 2013 and competed for the Palme d'Or. It aired on HBO on May 26, 2013 and was given a cinematic release in the United Kingdom on June 7, 2013. The film received general acclaim from television critics, mostly praising Douglas' and Damon's performances.

In 1977, 17-year-old Scott Thorson, who works as an animal trainer for movies, meets Bob Black, a Hollywood producer, in a gay bar. At Black's urging, he leaves his adopted home in search of better-paying work. Black introduces Thorson to Liberace, who takes an immediate liking to the handsome younger man. Liberace invites the two backstage and then to his luxurious home. Thorson observes that one of Liberace's beloved dogs is suffering from a temporary form of blindness, and with his veterinary assistant background, informs the famous pianist that he knows how to cure the condition. After treating the dog, Thorson becomes Liberace's "assistant" at the performer's request.
Scott moves in with Liberace and becomes his lover. At this point Scott says that he is bisexual because he is also attracted to women. Liberace is sympathetic, informing him that he wanted and tried to love women, but was exclusively attracted to men. He relates a story of a "divine healing" in which a "messenger" informed him that God still loved him.
It gradually becomes clear that Liberace is trying to mold Scott into a younger version of himself; he requests his plastic surgeon Dr. Startz to transform Scott's face to more closely resemble his own and makes an unsuccessful attempt to formally adopt him. When Liberace begins visiting pornographic theaters and suggests they see other people, Scott becomes upset. Meanwhile, Scott's drug abuse and Liberace's promiscuity create a rift that ultimately destroys their relationship: Scott retains an attorney to seek his financial share of the property, and Liberace ends their formal partnership and involves himself with his most recent "assistant".
Not long thereafter, Scott receives a phone call from Liberace telling him that he is very sick with what is later revealed to be AIDS, and would like Scott to visit him again. Scott agrees, and he and Liberace have one last, emotional deathbed conversation before Liberace dies in February 1987. Scott attends Liberace's funeral, in which he imagines seeing Liberace performing one last time with his traditional flamboyance, before being lifted to heaven with a stage harness.
Cast
Michael Douglas as Liberace
Matt Damon as Scott Thorson
Dan Aykroyd as Seymour Heller
Rob Lowe as Dr. Jack Startz
Debbie Reynolds as Frances Liberace
Scott Bakula as Bob Black
Tom Papa as Ray Arnett
Nicky Katt as Mr. Y
Cheyenne Jackson as Billy Leatherwood (based on Liberace's protégé Vince Cardell)
Paul Reiser as Mr. Felder
Boyd Holbrook as Cary James
David Koechner as Adoption Attorney


And the Emmy goes to...

Outstanding Lead Actor in a Miniseries or Movie
Michael Douglas 
as 
Liberace 
Behind the Candelabra 
HBO
Behind the Candelabra is a 2013 American drama film directed by Steven Soderbergh about the last ten years in the life of pianist Liberace and the secret affair he had with the younger Scott Thorson, based on Thorson’s memoir, Behind the Candelabra: My Life with Liberace (1988). Richard LaGravenese wrote the screenplay. Jerry Weintraub was the executive producer. It premiered at the 2013 Cannes Film Festival on May 21, 2013 and competed for the Palme d'Or. It aired on HBO on May 26, 2013 and was given a cinematic release in the United Kingdom on June 7, 2013. The film received general acclaim from television critics, mostly praising Douglas' and Damon's performances.

And the Emmy goes to...

Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Miniseries or Movie
Ellen Burstyn 
as 
Margaret Barrish Worthington 
Political Animals 
USA Network
Academy Award®, Golden Globe®, Emmy®, Tony®, and BAFTA Award® winner, Ellen Burstyn stars as Margaret Barrish

Former First Mother-in-Law Margaret Barrish is the tough, tell-it-like-it-is matriarch of the family, mother to Elaine and grandmother to T.J. and Douglas. A former Vegas showgirl who's seen (and done) it all, Margaret appreciates a cocktail or two, doesn't shy away from the limelight, and never feels the need to conform to convention. Though a staunch supporter of her daughter and grandsons, Margaret isn't blind to their shortcomings, and is willing to show some tough love and speak her mind when it comes to the choices she fears may take too heavy a toll on her family.

And the Emmy goes to...

Outstanding Directing for a Miniseries, Movie or a Dramatic Special
Behind the Candelabra
Directed 
by 
Steven Soderbergh 
HBO
Behind the Candelabra is a 2013 American drama film directed by Steven Soderbergh about the last ten years in the life of pianist Liberace and the secret affair he had with the younger Scott Thorson, based on Thorson’s memoir, Behind the Candelabra: My Life with Liberace (1988). Richard LaGravenese wrote the screenplay. Jerry Weintraub was the executive producer. It premiered at the 2013 Cannes Film Festival on May 21, 2013 and competed for the Palme d'Or. It aired on HBO on May 26, 2013 and was given a cinematic release in the United Kingdom on June 7, 2013. The film received general acclaim from television critics, mostly praising Douglas' and Damon's performances.

And the Emmy goes to...

Outstanding Writing for a Miniseries, Movie or a Dramatic Special
The Hour
Written 
by 
Abi Morgan 
BBC America
The Hour is a 2011 BBC drama series centered on a new current-affairs show being launched by the BBC in June 1956, at the time of the Hungarian Revolution and Suez Crisis. It starred Ben Whishaw, Dominic West and Romola Garai, with a supporting cast including Tim Pigott-Smith, Juliet Stevenson, Burn Gorman, Anton Lesser, Anna Chancellor, Julian Rhind-Tutt and Oona Chaplin. It was written by Abi Morgan (also one of the executive producers, alongside Jane Featherstone and Derek Wax).
The series premiered on BBC Two and BBC HD from 19 July 2011 each Tuesday at 9 pm. Each episode lasts 60 minutes, with Ruth Kenley-Letts as producer and Coky Giedroyc as lead director. It was commissioned by Janice Hadlow, Controller, BBC Two, and Ben Stephenson, Controller, BBC Drama Commissioning and produced by Kudos Film and Television.
Following the airing of the final episode of the first series, it was announced that a second series had been commissioned, which is co-produced by American network BBC America. It was shown beginning on 14 November 2012 in the UK, and on 28 November 2012 in the United States.
It was announced on 12 February 2013 that the series was cancelled by the BBC.

And the Emmy goes to..

Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Miniseries or Movie
James Cromwell 
as 
Dr. Arthur Arden / Hans Grüper  
American Horror Story: Asylum 
FX
Dr. Arthur Arden (James Cromwell) is a doctor at Briarcliff Institute and a former Nazi whose sadistic experiments have produced "Raspers", mutated former patients, who lurk in the woods surrounding the institution. He appears to have a history of violence towards women. He and Sister Jude often clash, seeing as he is often fighting for the power she has over the asylum. He becomes loyal to the possessed Sister Mary Eunice, after she attacks him, and helps frame Sister Jude for the murder of Frank McCann. He performs an experiment with Kit after he believes aliens have taken Grace's body. The experiment succeeds in causing the aliens to return, along with a now-pregnant Grace and patient Pepper, who tells Arden his experiments are a joke to the aliens and should be stopped. He later walks with Mary to feed the Raspers and shoots them all. He appears pathetic to Mary, which makes him even more depressed. When the monsignor later kills Mary, Arden insists that she should be cremated. Alone with her body at the furnace, he starts the fire inside, climbs on top of her, and starts the conveyor to immolate himself. For his performance, Mr. Cromwell was nominated for the Critics' Choice Television Award for Best Movie/Miniseries Supporting Actor and the  Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Miniseries or a Movie in 2013.

And the Emmy goes to..

Outstanding Choreography
Derek Hough 
Dancing with the Stars 
Routines
"Hey Pachuco" / "Para Los Rumberos" / "Walking on Air"
ABC
Derek Hough (/ˈhʌf/; born May 17, 1985) is an American dancer and choreographer. Holding a world champion title in Under 21 Latin American Dance, Hough has appeared since September 2007 (seasons 5–11 and 13–17) on the hit U.S. television series Dancing with the Stars, where he is the only four-time champion in the show's history (with Brooke Burke, Nicole Scherzinger, Jennifer Grey and Kellie Pickler), two time finalist (with Ricki Lake and Shawn Johnson), three-time semi-finalist (with Jennie Garth, Joanna Krupa, and Maria Menounos), and a quarter-finalist (with Lil' Kim).
Hough has earned five Creative Arts Primetime Emmy nominations for Outstanding Choreography for his work on the show. The first one was in 2009 when he shared a nomination with his younger sister Julianne Hough for their Jive routine to "Great Balls on Fire". The second and third ones were in 2010; one as choreographer for his Futuristic Paso Doble routine to "Living on Video" (danced with Joanna Krupa on season nine) and his Quickstep routine to "Anything Goes" (danced with Nicole Scherzinger on season ten) and one shared with Chelsie Hightower for their Paso Doble routine to "Malaquena". In addition to a 2013 nomination shared with Alison Holker for their two contemporary routines to "Heart Cry" (danced with Alison Holker, Melanie Moore, Jessica Lee Keller and Katherine McCormick on season 16) and to "Stars" (danced with Brilynn Rakes on season 16), Hough won an Emmy for his Quickstep routine to "Hey Pachuco", his Mambo routine to "Para Los Rumberos" (both danced with Shawn Johnson on All-stars season 15) and his routine to "Walking On Air" (danced with Jaimie Goodwin on season 16).
Prior to joining Dancing with the Stars, Hough starred as Ren in the 2006 original cast production of Footloose: The Musical at the Novelo Theatre in London's West End, as well as on the 2006 UK national tour. Hough's West End performance earned him a nomination as The Stuart Phillips London Newcomer of the Year in the Whatsonstage.com Theatregoers' Choice Awards. Hough made his Broadway debut on January 8, 2010, starring with Kym Johnson and Mary Murphy in Burn the Floor for the final four performances of the show's Broadway run. A founding member of the Ballas Hough Band (formerly Almost Amy), Hough shares lead vocals, plays guitar and has several songwriting credits on the band's self-titled debut CD, released by Hollywood Records in March 2009.

And the Emmy goes to...

Outstanding Writing for a Variety Series 
&
Outstanding Variety Series
The Colbert Report
Comedy Central
The Colbert Report (/koʊlˈbɛr rəˈpɔr/ kohl-bair rə-por) is an American satirical late night television program that airs Monday through Thursday on Comedy Central. It stars political humorist Stephen Colbert, a former correspondent for The Daily Show with Jon Stewart. The Colbert Report is a spin-off from and counterpart to The Daily Show that comments on politics and the media in a similar way. It satirizes conservative personality-driven political pundit programs, particularly Fox News' The O'Reilly Factor. The show focuses on a fictional anchorman character named Stephen Colbert, played by his real-life namesake. The character, described by Colbert as a "well-intentioned, poorly informed, high-status idiot", is a caricature of televised political pundits.
The Colbert Report has been nominated for seven Primetime Emmy Awards each in 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, and 2012, two Television Critics Association Awards Awards, and two Satellite Awards. It has been presented as non-satirical journalism in several instances, including by the Tom DeLay Legal Defense Trust and by Robert Wexler following his interview on the program. The Report received considerable media coverage following its debut on October 17, 2005, for Colbert's coining of the term "truthiness", which dictionary publisher Merriam-Webster named its 2006 Word of the Year.
The Report has had cultural influence in a number of ways. In 2006, Colbert won an online poll to name a bridge in Hungary, although after a visit from the Hungarian Ambassador it was announced that the bridge would not be named after him Colbert has mobilized viewers to participate in numerous other such polls, including the Time 100 online poll, a contest to name an International Space Station module (which Colbert did not ultimately win but received an honorable mention in the form of a treadmill), and pressuring Sweden’s tourism bureau into giving Colbert access to the Twitter account @Sweden. The show’s "Better Know a District" segment also received attention after Democratic Party leaders including Nancy Pelosi and Rahm Emanuel warned freshmen Representatives from appearing on the show, a moratorium lasting until Pelosi took back her statement in exchange for Colbert’s support of the DISCLOSE Act.

And the Emmy goes to...

Outstanding Directing for a Variety Series
Saturday Night Live
Directed 
by 
Don Roy King 
NBC
Saturday Night Live (abbreviated as SNL) is an American late-night live television sketch comedy and variety show created by Lorne Michaels and developed by Dick Ebersol. The show premiered on NBC on October 11, 1975, under the original title NBC's Saturday Night. The show's comedy sketches, which parody contemporary culture and politics, are performed by a large and varying cast of repertory and newer cast members. Each episode is hosted by a celebrity guest, who usually delivers an opening monologue and performs in sketches with the cast, and features performances by a musical guest. An episode normally begins with a cold open sketch that ends with someone breaking character and proclaiming, "Live from New York, it's Saturday Night!", beginning the show proper.
Michaels left the series in 1980 to explore other opportunities. He was replaced by Jean Doumanian, who was replaced by Ebersol after a season of bad reviews. Ebersol ran the show until 1985, when Michaels returned and has remained since. Many of SNL's cast found national stardom while appearing on the show and achieved success in film and television, both in front of and behind the camera. Others associated with the show, such as writers, have gone on to successful careers creating, writing, or starring in TV and film.
Broadcast from Studio 8H at NBC's headquarters in the GE Building, SNL has aired 745 episodes since its debut and concluded its thirty-eighth season on May 18, 2013, making it one of the longest-running network television programs in the United States. The show format has been developed and recreated in several countries including Spain, Italy, Brazil, Japan, and South Korea, each meeting with different levels of success. Successful sketches have seen life outside of the show as feature films, although only two met with critical and financial success: The Blues Brothers (1980) and Wayne's World (1992). The show has been marketed in other ways, including home media releases of "best of" and whole seasons, and books and documentaries about behind-the-scenes activities of running and developing the show.
Throughout more than three decades on air, Saturday Night Live has received a number of awards, including 36 Primetime Emmy Awards, a Peabody Award, and three Writers Guild of America Awards. In 2000, it was inducted into the National Association of Broadcasters Hall of Fame. It was ranked tenth in TV Guide's "50 Greatest TV Shows of All Time" list, and in 2007 it was listed as one of Time magazine's "100 Best TV Shows of All-TIME." As of 2012, it has received 156 Emmy nominations, the most in television history. The live aspect of the show has resulted in several controversies and acts of censorship, with mistakes and intentional acts of sabotage by performers and guests alike.

And the Emmy goes to...

Outstanding Directing for a Drama Series
House of Cards 
Episode
"Chapter 1"
Directed 
by 
David Fincher
Netflix
"Chapter 1" is the pilot episode of the American political thriller drama television series House of Cards and is the first episode of the first season. It premiered on February 1, 2013, when it was released, along with the rest of the first season, on the American streaming service Netflix. On July 18, 2013, this episode became the first web television webisode to earn Primetime Emmy Award nominations, including three Creative Arts Emmy Award nominations. On September 15, it became the first webisode to be Primetime Emmy-Awarded when Eigil Bryld won Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Cinematography for a Single-Camera Series at the 65th Primetime Creative Arts Emmy Awards.
"Chapter 1" was written by series developer Beau Willimon and directed by executive producer David Fincher. Frank Underwood (Kevin Spacey) is an ambitious Democratic congressman and the House Majority Whip. Underwood helped ensure the election of President Garrett Walker (Michael Gill), who promised to appoint Underwood as Secretary of State. However, before Walker is sworn in, Chief of Staff Linda Vasquez (Sakina Jaffrey) announces that the president will not honor the agreement and will instead nominate Senator Michael Kern. Furious at Walker's betrayal, Underwood and his wife Claire (Robin Wright), an environmental activist, make a pact to destroy Kern.
The episode was well received by most television critics. They praised the production values of the series, as well as praising the performances of the lead actors.

And the Emmy goes to..

Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series
Claire Danes 
as
Carrie Mathison 
Homeland 
Episode
"Q&A"
Showtime
"Q&A" is the fifth episode of the second season of the American television drama series Homeland, and the 17th episode overall. It originally aired on Showtime on October 28, 2012.
The original broadcast was watched by 2.07 million viewers which marked an all-time high for the series. Along with Dexter, it was the first time two Showtime programs topped two million viewers in the same night.

Brody (Damian Lewis) is brought to an unknown location and is alone, handcuffed in a room with cameras watching him. Quinn (Rupert Friend) enters and begins the interrogation while Saul (Mandy Patinkin) and Carrie (Claire Danes) observe from another room. He starts with a line of questioning designed to get Brody to tell a series of lies. Brody denies knowing Abu Nazir's son, and claims he never wore a suicide vest and had no involvement in any plot with Tom Walker. Quinn then shows the video of Brody's confession that they acquired and leaves him alone for a while to think about it. When Quinn returns, Brody readily confesses to knowing and loving Issa, and being angry at Vice President Walden, but denies ever wearing a suicide vest. Brody boasts that nothing happened in that bunker and they have no real evidence on him. When he can't extract any more information, Quinn explodes in anger and stabs Brody in the hand with a knife. Quinn later explains his actions to Saul as a performance, because "every good cop needs a bad cop."
Carrie takes over the interrogation and begins by shutting off all of the cameras in the room, though Saul and Quinn can still hear the audio. She removes Brody's handcuffs and gets him some water. Carrie then sits down and recaps how Brody wrecked her career and her life, and asks whether he felt any guilt doing it, and whether he had any feelings for her, to which Brody doesn't answer. She traps Brody in a lie about the confession video, and asks Brody when the last time he told the truth about something was. Carrie says it can be fun to tell the truth, and disarms Brody by blurting out that she wishes he would leave his family and move in with her. She describes how Abu Nazir systematically broke Brody down and rebuilt him, and recounts in detail some of Abu Nazir's past terrorist attacks which resulted in mass civilian casualties, referring to the civilians as "Chrises, Danas, and Jessicas." Carrie correctly surmises that it was a phone call from Dana that kept Brody from exploding the vest. She stresses that behind all of Brody's lies, there's a good man, and that's the Brody she fell in love with. Carrie characterizes Abu Nazir and Walden as "monsters" who will kill innocent people, but that Brody is not such a monster, because he was put in a position to do so but didn't explode the vest.
Carrie asks Brody what Abu Nazir's plot is. Brody finally breaks, confessing that Abu Nazir is planning an attack on the U.S., though he doesn't know the nature of it. He gives up the names of Roya Hammad, his handler, and Bassel, the tailor who crafted the suicide vest. As Brody recounts the various al-Qaeda associates he's had contact with, he realizes all of them are now dead. Later on, Carrie tells Brody his options. He can be exposed publicly, go to trial, and face prison time, or he can use his position to help the CIA anticipate Abu Nazir's planned attack, and nobody will have to know the truth about him.
Finn (Timothée Chalamet) takes Dana (Morgan Saylor) out on a date. Finn speeds away from a red light in an attempt to lose the Secret Service protection following him. The teens laugh as they speed through the streets weaving through traffic. Pulling out of an alley, Finn accidentally hits a pedestrian, seriously injuring her. Finn wants to flee the scene, dreading the consequences if anyone found out what he did, while Dana frantically protests. They drive away when they see another bystander helping the injured pedestrian.
Brody returns home. Jessica (Morena Baccarin) again demands the truth about what Brody's been doing if he is to be welcomed back into their home. Brody tells her that he's working with the CIA "helping out on matters of national security."

And the Emmy goes to...

Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series
Jeff Daniels 
Will McAvoy
The Newsroom
Episode
"We Just Decided To"
HBO
"We Just Decided To" is the first episode of the first season of the American television series The Newsroom. It first aired on June 24, 2012 in the United States on HBO. "We Just Decided To" was written by creator Aaron Sorkin and directed by Greg Mottola. In the aftermath of his public tirade, acclaimed news anchor Will McAvoy (Jeff Daniels) returns to his job to find that most of his staff are leaving and his new executive producer is his ex-girlfriend, MacKenzie McHale (Emily Mortimer) and when some breaking news about a potentially disastrous oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico hits the network, the staff faces a new challenge.
Entertainment Weekly reported in April 2009 that Sorkin, while still working on the screenplay for The Social Network, was contemplating a new TV drama about the behind-the-scenes events at a cable news program. To research the cable news world, Sorkin had been an off-camera guest at MSNBC's Countdown with Keith Olbermann in 2010 to observe the show's production and quizzed Parker Spitzer's staff when he was a guest on that show. Sorkin told TV Guide that he intended to take a less cynical view of the media: "They're going to be trying to do well in a context where it's very difficult to do well when there are commercial concerns and political concerns and corporate concerns."
According to the Nielsen Media Research, the episode attained 2.14 million viewers upon initial airing. "We Just Decided To" received mixed reviews from critics.

Men's Room Twinks - Nova Studios

Episode Six: Scoring The Swim Team Coach



Mens Room Twinks Episode Eight

And the Emmy goes to...

Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Drama Series
Bobby Cannavale 
as 
Gyp Rosetti 
Boardwalk Empire
Episode
"Sunday Best"
HBO
Nucky, Eli, and their respective families bond over Easter dinner. Richard takes young Tommy to dine with the Sagorskys, and Julia accepts Richard's invitation to the local Carnival. In danger of reprisal over his actions in Tabor Heights, Gyp brokers a deal with his boss, Joe Masseria. Gillian comes to terms with the death of Jimmy.

And the Emmy goes to...

Outstanding Reality - Competition Program
The Voice 
NBC
The Voice is an American reality television singing competition broadcast on NBC. Based on the original The Voice of Holland, the concept of the series is to find new singing talent (solo or duets) contested by aspiring singers, aged 15 or over, drawn from public auditions. The winner is determined by viewers by voting through telephone, Internet, SMS text, and iTunes Store purchases of artists' performances; they receive US$100,000 and a record deal with Universal Music Group. There have been four winners of the show to date: Javier Colon, Jermaine Paul, Cassadee Pope, and Danielle Bradbery.
The Voice began airing on April 26, 2011 as a spring TV season program. The show proved to be a hit for NBC and was subsequently expanded into the fall cycle when the third season premiered on September 10, 2012. The series employs a panel of four coaches who critique the artists' performances. Each coach guides their teams of selected artists through the remainder of the season. They also compete to ensure that their act wins the competition, thus making them the winning coach. The original judging panel consisted of Christina Aguilera, Cee Lo Green, Adam Levine, and Blake Shelton. The lineup for the fourth season included Levine, Shelton, Shakira, and Usher. The former panel will serve for the fifth season, while the latter lineup will be featured for the sixth season. The series is hosted by Carson Daly, with Christina Milian serving as a social media correspondent.

And the Emmy goes to...

Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Drama Series

Anna Gunn 
as 
Skyler White
Breaking Bad 
Episode
"Fifty-One"
AMC
Walt and Walter, Jr. pick up the Aztec from an auto repair shop, getting an impromptu history of all the repairs the beleaguered vehicle's been through this year. Still, the mechanic says the sturdy car has a lot of miles left in it. Walt retrieves his Heisenberg porkpie hat from the front seat, and — not thrilled at the prospect of driving this car until the day he dies — sells the car to the mechanic for $50.

Afterward, Walt pulls into the driveway in a brand-new Chrysler. Walter, Jr., watching from his PT Cruiser, gives the car mild approval. Walt gets the message: it's hard to love your dad's new ride when youíre cruising in a mom-mobile. A few hours later, Walt pulls into the driveway followed by Jr. in a new Dodge Challenger — the same model Skyler insisted go back to the dealership months ago. They both rev their engines, giddy with exhilaration.

At Madrigal in Houston, Lydia receives a call from Mike, who warns that the police are about to arrive. A few seconds later, Hank and Gomez enter with officers in tow. Lydia escorts them to the Madrigal warehouse and points out Ron, the foreman. Ron stares daggers at her as the officers arrest him: she's thrown one of her own to the wolves.

And the Emmy goes to...

Outstanding Writing for a Drama Series
Homeland 
Episode
"Q&A"
Written 
by 
Henry Bromell 
Showtime
"Q&A" is the fifth episode of the second season of the American television drama series Homeland, and the 17th episode overall. It originally aired on Showtime on October 28, 2012.
The original broadcast was watched by 2.07 million viewers which marked an all-time high for the series. Along with Dexter, it was the first time two Showtime programs topped two million viewers in the same night.

Brody (Damian Lewis) is brought to an unknown location and is alone, handcuffed in a room with cameras watching him. Quinn (Rupert Friend) enters and begins the interrogation while Saul (Mandy Patinkin) and Carrie (Claire Danes) observe from another room. He starts with a line of questioning designed to get Brody to tell a series of lies. Brody denies knowing Abu Nazir's son, and claims he never wore a suicide vest and had no involvement in any plot with Tom Walker. Quinn then shows the video of Brody's confession that they acquired and leaves him alone for a while to think about it. When Quinn returns, Brody readily confesses to knowing and loving Issa, and being angry at Vice President Walden, but denies ever wearing a suicide vest. Brody boasts that nothing happened in that bunker and they have no real evidence on him. When he can't extract any more information, Quinn explodes in anger and stabs Brody in the hand with a knife. Quinn later explains his actions to Saul as a performance, because "every good cop needs a bad cop."
Carrie takes over the interrogation and begins by shutting off all of the cameras in the room, though Saul and Quinn can still hear the audio. She removes Brody's handcuffs and gets him some water. Carrie then sits down and recaps how Brody wrecked her career and her life, and asks whether he felt any guilt doing it, and whether he had any feelings for her, to which Brody doesn't answer. She traps Brody in a lie about the confession video, and asks Brody when the last time he told the truth about something was. Carrie says it can be fun to tell the truth, and disarms Brody by blurting out that she wishes he would leave his family and move in with her. She describes how Abu Nazir systematically broke Brody down and rebuilt him, and recounts in detail some of Abu Nazir's past terrorist attacks which resulted in mass civilian casualties, referring to the civilians as "Chrises, Danas, and Jessicas." Carrie correctly surmises that it was a phone call from Dana that kept Brody from exploding the vest. She stresses that behind all of Brody's lies, there's a good man, and that's the Brody she fell in love with. Carrie characterizes Abu Nazir and Walden as "monsters" who will kill innocent people, but that Brody is not such a monster, because he was put in a position to do so but didn't explode the vest.
Carrie asks Brody what Abu Nazir's plot is. Brody finally breaks, confessing that Abu Nazir is planning an attack on the U.S., though he doesn't know the nature of it. He gives up the names of Roya Hammad, his handler, and Bassel, the tailor who crafted the suicide vest. As Brody recounts the various al-Qaeda associates he's had contact with, he realizes all of them are now dead. Later on, Carrie tells Brody his options. He can be exposed publicly, go to trial, and face prison time, or he can use his position to help the CIA anticipate Abu Nazir's planned attack, and nobody will have to know the truth about him.
Finn (Timothée Chalamet) takes Dana (Morgan Saylor) out on a date. Finn speeds away from a red light in an attempt to lose the Secret Service protection following him. The teens laugh as they speed through the streets weaving through traffic. Pulling out of an alley, Finn accidentally hits a pedestrian, seriously injuring her. Finn wants to flee the scene, dreading the consequences if anyone found out what he did, while Dana frantically protests. They drive away when they see another bystander helping the injured pedestrian.
Brody returns home. Jessica (Morena Baccarin) again demands the truth about what Brody's been doing if he is to be welcomed back into their home. Brody tells her that he's working with the CIA "helping out on matters of national security."

And the Emmy goes to...

Outstanding Lead Actress in a Miniseries or Movie
Laura Linney 
as 
Cathy Jamison 
The Big C: Hereafter 
Showtime

The Big C is a Showtime original television series created by Darlene Hunt which premiered on August 16, 2010. It drew the largest audience for a Showtime original series premiere in eight years.The second season premiered on June 27, 2011. The third season premiered on April 8, 2012. On July 31, 2012, The Big C was renewed for a fourth and final season, named "Hereafter", which premiered on Monday, April 29, 2013 and concluded on May 20, 2013.

And the Emmys goes to...

Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series
Jim Parsons 
as 
Dr. Sheldon Cooper 
The Big Bang Theory 
Episode
"The Habitation Configuration"
CBS
Sheldon invites Wil Wheaton for a special Fun With Flags podcast about Star Trek flags. However Wheaton and Amy don't get along, prompting Amy to request Sheldon to ask Wheaton to leave. When he refuses, she leaves in a huff, creating a standoff between the two. After unsuccessfully trying to make Amy respect Wheaton, he confesses his relationship worries to Penny at the Cheesecake Factory bar, who chides him for not standing up for Amy when Wheaton was insulting her despite being a Texan. In the course of their conversation, he also gets drunk after Penny mischeviously offers him Long Island Iced Tea. Still drunk, he then goes over to Wheaton's house and forces him to apologize to Amy, challenging him Texan style. Wheaton, who is surprised by Sheldon's drunk behavior, does apologize, shortly before Sheldon comes to his senses and vomits in his shrubs. Later Sheldon and Amy, who have now reconciled, reshoot the special podcast with LeVar Burton as the special guest, but Amy doesn't get along with him either.
Meanwhile, Howard finally moves into Bernadette's apartment after Bernadette reminds him of his promise to her that he would move out of his house once he returns from space. While unpacking his things at Bernadette's apartment, he comes across his old magic set. He then reminisces about how he used to cheer up his mother by performing magic tricks after his father left them. On hearing this, Bernadette changes her mind and forces him to move back in with his mother, at least until he doesn't have mother issues.
Recurring characters
Wil Wheaton as himself and Carol Ann Susi as Mrs. Wolowitz
Guest star
LeVar Burton as himself


And the Emmy goes to....

Outstanding Directing for a Comedy Series
Modern Family 
Episode
"Arrested"
Directed 
by 
Gail Mancuso 
ABC
"Arrested" is the 7th episode of the fourth season of the American sitcom Modern Family, and the series' 79th episode overall. It aired November 7, 2012. The episode was written by Becky Mann & Audra Sielaff and directed by Gail Mancuso.

Phil (Ty Burrell) and Claire (Julie Bowen) get a phone call in the middle of the night from the police because Haley (Sarah Hyland) has been arrested for under-aged drinking. They have to go and bail her out and Claire calls Mitchell (Jesse Tyler Ferguson) to ask him to go with them in case Haley needs a lawyer. When they arrive at the police station, they find out that Haley was not only drinking, but she also resisted arrest and assaulted a police officer. After being bailed out, Haley must attend a disciplinary hearing at school. Instead of defending herself Haley, in a moment of complete honestly, blurts out everything illegal she has done since the day she came to the college. After being dismissed her from college, she goes back home with Phil and Claire who are disappointed but proud that Haley is taking responsibility for her actions.
While Phil, Claire and Mitchell are in Haley's college, Cameron (Eric Stonestreet) stays back to watch over Alex (Ariel Winter) and Luke (Nolan Gould). During the breakfast, Cam made some 'bacon' from soy, without knowing that Luke is allergic to soy. That leads them to the emergency room at the hospital.
Gloria (Sofia Vergara) wants to go shopping to buy things for the baby but Jay (Ed O'Neill) gets out of it. Staying at home though is not the best idea since DeDe (Shelley Long) pays him a surprise visit. Jay tries to get rid of her as soon as possible so DeDe won't find out that Gloria is pregnant. When Gloria comes back home, DeDe's reaction to the news has nothing in common with the one Jay was expecting.

And the Emmy Goes to...

Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series

Julia Louis-Dreyfus 
as 
Selina Meyer 
Veep 
Episode
"Running"
HBO
With the administration flailing in the fallout from the CIA agent-Uzbekistan hostage crisis scandal, Vice President Selina Meyer finally sees a door opening for her to attain the power she's always wanted. Unfortunately she crashes into a plate of glass when she tries to walk through it.

Last week, Selina caused a stir when she apologized for the cover-up of the presence CIA spy among some U.S. students held hostage some weeks back. She was actually just as in the dark about the spy's identity as everyone else in the country. But heaven forbid she admit being out of the loop.

"I mean, I lied and everything, but it sounded true, at least," Selina says, as the apology has earned her the moniker "the no BS VP."

The pressure is on for the president to come clean about the controversy, and Selina thinks she can ride out the scandal to the White House in six years. That is, until rumors emerge that someone from within the party will rise up to challenge the president before his first term is even over. Ambitious war veteran Danny Chung looks to be a prime suspect, releasing a Spotify playlist, a la Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.), that had been curated by Dan, who along with Amy, is gunning for a spot on Chung's campaign.

Nevertheless, Selina must walk a fine line of appearing supportive of the president while using the scandal to her political advantage.

"There's going to be difficult choices to make, like 'Sophie's Choice' choices, except more important because they're gonna be about me," she tells her staff.

But before she can break the glass ceiling, and become the ovaries in the Oval Office, as Mike jokes (or "the womb in the West Wing," which Gary calls her, making everyone uncomfortable), she walks through a glass window on the way to a fundraising brunch.

"That woman has become a living metaphor for her own career," Dan smirks. And the situation only gets worse when the antidepressants Selina is taking react badly to some St. John's wort Gary gives her ("I think I got that off a Catholic school girl, once," Dan says, always the skeeze).

Selina turns into a bloody, loopy mess, unable to meet the donors who would fund a potential presidential run and unable to comment on the rumors that she is planning said run.

Among the things she promises while high on the herbal painkillers is that she will buy Mike's boat off of him (he is drowning in debt) and go to Gary's parents' anniversary party (he is drowning in mommy issues). The accident also inspires one of those crazy, Taiwanese animation news cartoons. (This company actually exists; check out the latest about Vladimir Putin's alleged Super Bowl Ring theft).

But Selina doesn't let the accident, or the painkiller high, stop her from running in the Let's Move 10K the next day, much to Gary's disappointment, as he can't keep up with her speedy pace. While on the run, the heat gets turned up on the president – with the possibility of an impeachment being thrown around – and Selina decides she will not be dragged down with him.

"Look at me. I am covered in scabs. I smell like a hobo's crap hole," she tells Amy. "I'm not going to run with him in two years. I am not going to be his vice president. I'm finished."

Just in time for the season finale, now Dan and Amy must decide if they want to jump Selina's ship for Chung's campaign, or stick along for Selina's political kamikaze mission.

And the Emmy goes to...

Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series
Tony Hale 
as 
Gary Walsh
Veep 
Episod
"Running"
HBO
With the administration flailing in the fallout from the CIA agent-Uzbekistan hostage crisis scandal, Vice President Selina Meyer finally sees a door opening for her to attain the power she's always wanted. Unfortunately she crashes into a plate of glass when she tries to walk through it.

Last week, Selina caused a stir when she apologized for the cover-up of the presence CIA spy among some U.S. students held hostage some weeks back. She was actually just as in the dark about the spy's identity as everyone else in the country. But heaven forbid she admit being out of the loop.

"I mean, I lied and everything, but it sounded true, at least," Selina says, as the apology has earned her the moniker "the no BS VP."

The pressure is on for the president to come clean about the controversy, and Selina thinks she can ride out the scandal to the White House in six years. That is, until rumors emerge that someone from within the party will rise up to challenge the president before his first term is even over. Ambitious war veteran Danny Chung looks to be a prime suspect, releasing a Spotify playlist, a la Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.), that had been curated by Dan, who along with Amy, is gunning for a spot on Chung's campaign.

Nevertheless, Selina must walk a fine line of appearing supportive of the president while using the scandal to her political advantage.

"There's going to be difficult choices to make, like 'Sophie's Choice' choices, except more important because they're gonna be about me," she tells her staff.

But before she can break the glass ceiling, and become the ovaries in the Oval Office, as Mike jokes (or "the womb in the West Wing," which Gary calls her, making everyone uncomfortable), she walks through a glass window on the way to a fundraising brunch.

"That woman has become a living metaphor for her own career," Dan smirks. And the situation only gets worse when the antidepressants Selina is taking react badly to some St. John's wort Gary gives her ("I think I got that off a Catholic school girl, once," Dan says, always the skeeze).

Selina turns into a bloody, loopy mess, unable to meet the donors who would fund a potential presidential run and unable to comment on the rumors that she is planning said run.

Among the things she promises while high on the herbal painkillers is that she will buy Mike's boat off of him (he is drowning in debt) and go to Gary's parents' anniversary party (he is drowning in mommy issues). The accident also inspires one of those crazy, Taiwanese animation news cartoons. (This company actually exists; check out the latest about Vladimir Putin's alleged Super Bowl Ring theft).

But Selina doesn't let the accident, or the painkiller high, stop her from running in the Let's Move 10K the next day, much to Gary's disappointment, as he can't keep up with her speedy pace. While on the run, the heat gets turned up on the president – with the possibility of an impeachment being thrown around – and Selina decides she will not be dragged down with him.

"Look at me. I am covered in scabs. I smell like a hobo's crap hole," she tells Amy. "I'm not going to run with him in two years. I am not going to be his vice president. I'm finished."

Just in time for the season finale, now Dan and Amy must decide if they want to jump Selina's ship for Chung's campaign, or stick along for Selina's political kamikaze mission.

And the Emmy goes to....

Outstanding Writing for a Comedy Series
30 Rock 
Episode
"Last Lunch"
Written 
by 
Tina Fey & Tracey Wigfield 
NBC
"Last Lunch" is the thirteenth episode of the seventh season of the American television comedy series 30 Rock, the 138th overall episode, and the second part of the one-hour series finale. It was directed by Beth McCarthy-Miller and written by Tina Fey and Tracey Wigfield. The episode originally aired as an hour-long episode, along with "Hogcock!", on the National Broadcasting Company (NBC) network in the United States on January 31, 2013. Guest stars in this episode include Marceline Hugot, Al Roker, Conan O'Brien and Alice Ripley.
In the episode, Liz Lemon (Fey) returns for the final episode of TGS and is thrown into a world of chaos: Jack Donaghy (Alec Baldwin) has quit his job and appears to be on the verge of suicide, Tracy Jordan (Tracy Morgan) is attempting to stop the episode going ahead, because he is due a payout from the network if it doesn't, and Lutz (John Lutz) is attempting to use his turn to pick lunch for the writers as an opportunity to exact revenge on them for constantly picking on him. Meanwhile, Kenneth Parcell (Jack McBrayer) attempts to extract some genuine emotion from Jenna Maroney (Jane Krakowski), as she readies her final song for the show.
Together, "Hogcock!" and "Last Lunch" received acclaim from critics. According to Nielsen Media Research, the episodes were watched by 4.88 million viewers during their original broadcast, becoming 30 Rock's highest-rated episodes for two years. 

And the Emmy goes to...

Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series
Merritt Wever 
as 
Zoey Barkow 
Nurse Jackie 
Episode: 
"Teachable Moments"
Showtime
A psych patient ravages the pharmacy because Akalitus forgot to get the patient an escort, and Eddie and Jackie decide they need to find out what's wrong with Gloria. Zoey finds a way to change Dr. Prentiss's awful bedside manner, and Coop gives up mentoring Carrie after she misses an appendicitis. Frank cancels a lunch date with Jackie to pick up an extra shift and has her scared to death when a call about a cop being shot comes in.

The CAPTION THIS Contest For September 20th!

From:  Dlisted
 After the jump, check out the  winning caption for September 19th!

Guess His Dick: Reveal

Sexy Surfer Edition
From:  Queer Click
 Have you taken some time to mull it over? Do you guys have a special dick-guessing forensic procedure by this point? We'd love to know how you guys are so good at guessing. Other than years of practice, that is.







The verDICKt
Seven inches, cut. 
And let's just say it, QueerClickers, that is one pretty dick. Don't you agree?

 ADVOCATE MEN  
June 1987

Jeff Stryker (Fred Bisonnes)
Sebastien
Wayne Petrovsky
David Brooks
Face Man: Anthony Randall (Fred Bisonnes)

Jeff Stryker (born Charles Casper Peyton) on August 21, 1962, in Carmi, Illinois, U.S.) is an American porn star who has starred in bisexual, gay, and straight adult films. He lives in California.
 Jeff Stryker is primarily known as a performer in gay pornography films, although Jamie Loves Jeff was one of the biggest selling heterosexual adult movies of all time for its producer, Vivid Entertainment. He describes himself (in a somewhat joking fashion) as sexually "universal". He has also said, "I don’t define myself as anything."
He also tried his hand at acting, starring in a 1989 Italian-produced horror movie called After Death (Revenge of the Zombies), in which he was credited as Chuck Peyton and was seen in the short film Can I Be Your Bratwurst Please?.
 Stryker was inducted into the AVN Hall of Fame for his body of work in adult films.
Stryker was featured in a 1991 portrait by artists Pierre et Gilles.
Stryker was inducted into the Hustler Porn Walk of Fame (outside the West Hollywood store and cafe) on January 15, 2004.
 The “Jeff Stryker Cock and Balls,” a dildo fashioned from a cast of his penis, is widely sold in sex stores. The dildo was academically analyzed in a paper presented at the 1995 Bowling Green State University Conference in Cultural Studies: Lesbian Pornography and Transformation: Foucault, Bourdieu, and de Certeau Make Sense of the Jeff Stryker Dildo, by Mary T. Conway, then a graduate student at Temple University. The sex toy is notable not only for being popular, but also as Stryker and the manufacturer of the item litigated for the rights to its likeness as part of Stryker's "intellectual property". (The case eventually reached a mutually acceptable resolution ) In a 1999 salon.com article written by Jeff Stryker, a New York journalist and the porn actor's namesake, the dildo is even described as an object of higher culture. It was mentioned in Allan Gurganus' 1997 novel Plays Well with Others, where the novel's narrator cleans up a closet filled with dildos, the premium find being "a Jeff Stryker, a monster, but somehow Roman in its genial fluted civic beauty."
Stryker has released a compact disc (Wild Buck) of country music that he performed, and in his pornographic video, Bigger Than Life, he performed a rock song of the same name.
A licensed line of Jeff Stryker products is available: calendars, playing cards, T-shirts, greeting cards, Stryker Lube and the Jeff Stryker Action Figure.

 Filmmaker and author John Waters called Jeff Stryker “the Cary Grant of porno.”
American comedienne Margaret Cho's routines involve her love for his films. In her show, Assassin, she discusses in detail the many places one can use the dildo. Stryker had given Cho his commercially-produced action figure.
In her autobiography, Traci Lords describes him as “handsome but rather dumb looking” after he gave her scornful looks backstage during a Century City Civic Center Thierry Mugler Fashion show.
 Stryker later sued Health Devices Inc. and California Publishers Liquidating Corp. for over $1 million for breach of contract and piracy when they sold a bootleg dildo of his genitals without paying him sufficiently. The case was heard before a judge in Los Angeles, who eventually brokered a deal whereby the case was dismissed upon payment of $25,000 to Stryker and the return and right to reproduce all items which Stryker endorsed.
In January 2009, the L.A. Weekly reported that Stryker blamed Kulak's Woodshed, a folk-music nightclub, for preventing him from completing his autobiography, as the noise and crowds disturbed his concentration. “(My writing has) been put on perpetual hold until I can get myself back together,” he told the newspaper. “I got a $25,000 advance on (the book) but could never complete it.” According to the L.A. Weekly, Paul Kulak claims that Stryker has made threats to him and the club's customers: “He constantly reminds me he’s a firearms expert and will hide behind his back door when I dump the trash. Once, he started making mechanical gun clicks. I could see he had a pistol in his hand as he was dry-firing it... I’m willing to risk my life to keep this [club] going.” Stryker responded to Kulak's claim and was quoted as saying, "That guy is so out there!"

 Stryker appeared in "A Sophisticated Evening with Jeff Stryker" in Los Angeles, Summer 2006, and also in Provincetown, Massachusetts, Summer 2007. The show was produced by comedy writer Bruce Vilanch. In that show, Stryker performed a comic monologue about his life and adventures in adult films, conducted a "porn acting demo" comedy skit with an audience member, and danced in a nude finale where he greeted the audience.

See More of Jeff After the Jump:

Brian Hawks - Men's Room Twinks - Nova Studios

Episode Six: Bathroom Break


Alejandro Fernández

Alejandro Fernández Abarca (Spanish pronunciation: [aleˈxandro feɾˈnandes]; born April 24, 1971) is a Mexican singer.
Nicknamed as "El Potrillo" (The Colt) by the media and his fans, he has sold over 30 million albums worldwide. Alejandro is the son of the ranchera singer Vicente Fernández.  He originally specialized in traditional, earthy forms of Mexican folk music, such as mariachi and ranchera. He has branched out with great success to pop music.

Sunday September 22, 2013: Hunk of the Day

From:  Daily Hunks

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