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On this blog you I am going to share my world with you. What can you expect to find here -- First of all lots of sexy men, off all shapes and types, something for everyone, as I can find beauty in most men. You are going to find that I have a special fondness for Vintage Beefcake and Porn of the 60's, 70's, and 80's. Also, I love the average guy, and if you want to see yourself on here, just let me know. Be as daring as you like, as long as you are of age, let me help you share it with the world! Also, you are going to find many of my points of views, on pop culture, politics and our changing world. Look to see posts about pop culture, politics, entertainment, sex, etc. There is not any subject that I find as something I won't discuss or offer my point of view. Most of all, I hope you are going to enjoy what I post. ENJOY!

Tuesday, February 28, 2017

Accounting Firm PricewaterhouseCoopers Apologizes for Massive ‘Best Picture’ Oscar Flub

From: Towleroad
Moonlight took home the Oscar for Best Picture Sunday night after the most massive mistake in Oscar history in which La La Land was initially handed the award after a wrong envelope was given to presenters Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway

PricewaterhouseCoopers, the accounting firm behind the Oscar ballots, issued an apology late last night:


“We sincerely apologize to Moonlight, La La Land, Warren Beatty, Faye Dunaway and Oscar viewers for the error that was made during the award announcement for Best Picture. The presenters had mistakenly been given the wrong category envelope and when discovered, was immediately corrected. We are currently investigating how this could have happened, and deeply regret that this occurred.
“We appreciate the grace with which the nominees, the Academy, ABC, and Jimmy Kimmel handled the situation.”


Academy Awards Ads Embrace Love, Inclusion And The LGBT Community

The commercials really are the best part.
From: NewNowNext
Oscars host Jimmy Kimmel made a joke about uniting the country, but it was advertisers who offered a glimmer of hope and empathy.

Cadillac’s latest “Dare Greatly” commercial, which debuted during Sunday’s ceremony, showed people gathering for protests and vigils, as well as moments of bravery and perseverance. Among the images were signs supporting LGBT rights and Muslim Americans, as well as shots of iconic Americans like Muhammed Ali and Marilyn Monroe.




“There’s quite a bit of soul-searching going on in the nation right now, and the creative community, in particular, is experiencing it at an intense level,” said Melody Lee, director of brand marketing at Cadillac. “It was important for us, as a brand, to try to make a statement, not politically and not necessarily socially, but to remind the country that we’re at our best when we come together.”

An earlier ad in the “Dare Greatly” series featured designer Jason Wu discussing his mother had been supportive of his playing with dolls and designing clothes from a young age.

“The Oscars is the Super Bowl of pop culture,” Lee told AdWeek. “It has the second-largest live audience after the Super Bowl, so it fits with our strategy of putting Cadillac at the center of culture. Our efforts are built around restoring the brand to where it used to be, as an icon of pop culture. Our goal is to build emotional resonance with the Gen X and Gen Y crowd, and this year, we’re trying to build historical relevance as well.”

But Cadillac was hardly the only sponsor to acknowledge the Oscars, one of the priciest nights of the year to buy ad space, have a sizable LGBT following: A same-sex wedding was among the events featured in a spot for Google Photo that aired several times.



And YouTube ran a spot for the new Gigi Gorgeous documentary, This is Everything..



Lady Gaga and Ellen DeGeneres appeared in an announcement for The Love Project, a Revlon-sponsored campaign supporting nonprofits including the Born This Way Foundation and The Trevor Project.

Google Doodle for February 28, 2017

Abdul Sattar Edhi’s 89th Birthday
Today's Doodle honors Abdul Sattar Edhi, a global-reaching philanthropist and humanitarian who made it his life’s mission to helping those in need.

Edhi was born in India but moved to Karachi shortly after Pakistan was formed. He soon noticed that many Pakistanis lacked shelter, medicine, education, and other essentials, and was moved to help in any way he could. He began by simply asking others around him to contribute time or money, especially when a flu epidemic hit Karachi. In a 2009 interview with NPR, he said, "I got medical students to volunteer. I was penniless and begged for donations on the street. And people gave."

In 1951, he established the Edhi foundation, which is funded solely by private donations. The foundation, which operates 24 hours a day, provides a variety of social services from homeless shelters to medical care — all free of charge — and has helped thousands of people around the world in times of need. Most notably, the foundation operates the world’s largest volunteer ambulance network in Pakistan. "In my entire life I have driven no other car except my ambulance," Edhi said.

Edhi was directly involved with the foundation throughout the rest of his life. He always focused more on those around him than on his own comfort or needs. In fact, he and his family slept in a room near the foundation's headquarters and had only a few belongings. But his charitable empire and "family" were vast — at the time of his death, he and his wife Bilquis were registered as parents or guardians of tens of thousands of Pakistani children. “My mission is to love human beings," he said in an interview. "Each day is the best day of my life."

Here’s to Edhi, whose unwavering commitment to others will always be remembered.

WHEN WE RISE: A Valiant Effort

From: Boy Culture
 When We Rise, ABC's miniseries event written by Dustin Lance Black to capture the long arc of the gay-rights movement, debuted, last night,  February 27 on ABC at 9 p.m. Positioned as a gay Roots, it isn't, at least judging from the opening installment.

Charlie Carver & Jonathan Majors seek a reprieve from the horrors of Vietnam.
 (Video still via ABC)
 A terrific idea bogged down by too broad a scope — the creatives seemingly try to jam in every aspect of the LGBTQ movement from the early '70s on  — When We Rise is further done in by a canned, stagey quality with dialogue that's forced to cue viewers about significant milestones rather than allowed to serve the characters. That makes it more docu than drama, and leads to a preachy tone.


 Among the performances, Jonathan Majors & Charlie Carver are briefly sweet together in a Vietnam War romance, Austin P. McKenzie has an ethereal idealism as young activist Cleve Jones and Emily Skeggs, whose character finds herself caught in the crossfire between the feminist and lesbian movements, nails the mix between personal coming-of-age and finding one's greater purpose.

Guy Pearce doesn't come off nearly as well.

Famous faces like him— Rosie O'Donnell, Whoopi Goldberg, Rachel Griffiths — tend to feel like stars whose presence helped get this made; friendly faces, but distracting more than acting.


Austin P. McKenzie as Cleve Jones
 (Image via ABC)
Though When We Rise is by no means great drama, let's hope it will draw in some non-gay viewers desperately in need of some enlightenment, and some LGBTQ viewers desperately in need of reminding that people fought and died for their rights — and that those rights could be in the process of going up in smoke.

Bottom line: Commendable endeavor, informative, occasionally quite watchable, but not great art. If you can live with that, you might find yourself hooked for the run.

A look inside Hollywood’s shameful absence of LGBTQ leading men & women

From: Queerty
 Fans of diversity at the Oscars have plenty of reason to celebrate. In a striking contrast with the nominees of the past two years, 2017 set a new record for inclusion. For the first time, each major category featured a person of color as a nominee, and in some cases, more than one. The Best Supporting Actress category featured an impressive three African-American nominees, including Naomie Harris, previous winner Octavia Spencer, and gay icon in the making Viola Davis.

This new level of inclusion extends beyond just African-Americans as well; the Indian Dev Patel picked up a Best Supporting Actor nomination, while rising Latino star Lin-Manuel Miranda took a nomination for Best Song. Much of this year’s diversity comes from the success of one film in particular—Moonlight, the story of a gay, African-American man growing up in Miami. And it could not have come at a better time with an unhinged “president” afflicting minorities of all sorts, in all sorts of ways.

But where does our community stand in terms of inclusion? Contrary to the claim of Oscar-winning musician Sam Smith in 2016, plenty of gay men have won Academy Awards. That said, acknowledging past queer winners and nominees becomes tricky. Laurence Olivier, George Bernard Shaw and Charles Laughton all took home Oscars, though none could live as openly gay in their day. Indeed, the Academy Awards have always loved diversity in more technical and behind the scenes roles, with the community racking up dozens of Oscars and nominations in categories like writing, directing and art direction. People have color have done better there, too, though that Barry Jenkins’ double nomination as the writer/director of Moonlight marks the first time since 1992 that an African-American has scored both says a lot.

Thus, the real diversity challenge at the Oscars becomes evident. It’s not that the Academy has a problem with queer artists; rather, it has a problem with out gay artists–particularly in front of the camera. While openly gay men like Bill Condon (writer of Gods and Monsters), Dustin Lance Black (writer, Milk) or Elton John have all taken home the statue, and while other out-and-proud cinephiles (Scott Rudin, producer of The Hours, Lee Daniels, director of Precious) have scored nominations, few actors could say the same.

While queer actors have won Oscars, only one openly gay actor has won an Academy Award: Linda Hunt. While the bisexual Angelina Jolie also has Oscar gold, the world tends to think of her as Hollywood’s first humanitarian mom, rather than the sexually fluid woman of her youth. Twice-winner Jodie Foster, while never denying her lesbianism, never made any public acknowledgement of her sexual orientation before her wins. Ian McKellen has also come close with two nominations to his name, though while tipped to win both times, he has yet to take Oscar home. Though Hollywood loves to award straight actors who play gay (Tom Hanks), lesbian (Charlize Theron), bisexual (Nicole Kidman) or transgendered (Hillary Swank) characters, recognizing queer actors for real-life achievements still makes tinsel town uncomfortable. Moreover, that only one said example—Daniels—is a person of color, further speaks to Hollywood’s issues with racial diversity.


Systemic Issues?

Where are the out gay actors? In general, women tend to have a bit of an easier time scoring big parts. Lesbians like Foster, Jolie, Ellen Page, Kate McKinnon and Ruby Rose all work often, and in a variety of roles. Out gay men have it much harder, particularly when it comes to leading parts. Rupert Everett, Zachary Quinto, and Matt Bomer all continue to work in film, though usually in supporting roles. That Quinto and Bomer, along with out actors Jim Parsons, Neil Patrick Harris, Luke Evans and Nathan Lane have all fared far better on television should also raise eyebrows. With the announcement of the GLAAD awards on January 31 including only two wide-release film nominees (one, Star Trek Beyond, had little queer content beyond an ambiguous hug) scored nominations, while comedy and drama TV series had ten contenders each.

Given the popularity and much broader success of gay performers on TV, the dearth of out leading actors in film becomes all the more questionable. While the industry often blames a resistance from the audience, the success of television performers suggests that viewers have no problem with gay actors in leading roles. The real problem, then, rests elsewhere. Part of the long-running issue with racial diversity and the Oscars has less to do with voter attitudes than with a lack of good roles for people of minority races.

With the queer community, the case is a bit different; it’s not that there aren’t parts for gay actors. Rather, Hollywood seems opposed to casting gay actors at all. For those of us that live and work “in town,” whispers about sexuality fuel a nonstop rumor mill. For that matter, so do the cautions against gay actors: sex scenes are fine, but never have a same-sex kiss (Hollywood considers the former “brave,” and the latter icky) .Avoid playing physical stereotypes like the butch lesbian or effeminate gay guy. Beware an actual coming out–casting directors will only cast gay actors as gay characters, and getting an agent will become even harder. The uber-macho and often sociopathic agents, managers and lawyers who to this day have open disdain for queer artists, often will accept them only begrudgingly as clients, it at all. Studios too might shoulder some of the blame, though the number of openly gay executives working in Hollywood would make such an assumption somewhat counter intuitive.

All the out-gay-successful performers chronicled here share another unnerving similarity—they’re all white. To come full circle on racial diversity, where are the out people of color—African-Americans, Latinos and especially Asians—in front of the cameras? Common sense recognizes that queer people of color exist in real life, so why do so few characters in the movies reflect as much? Movies love to cast gay characters as the best friend or as comic relief. Why can’t queer men and women kick ass in action pictures, or find love in mainstream romantic comedies?

The problem of Hollywood diversity, both in terms of race and in terms of sexuality & gender, extends far beyond Oscar recognition. Like other issues of race and homophobia in America, the lack of inclusion comes from systemic prejudice, and from a bigoted power class bent blocking progress for the sake of their own self-satisfaction. The lack of queer people of color, too, might have roots in the views on sexuality and gender within those racial communities—the way African-Americans, Latinos or Asians view LGBT folk within their own populations. Both the racial civil rights and LGBT movements have affirmed the same solution to both issues: courage and leadership. Only through trailblazing leaders, unafraid to suffer the wounds of standing on the front lines can progress come to fruition. It will take queer leaders from the African-American, Latino and Asian communities to help broaden the still-myopic view that only white, queer actors, or white, queer characters belong in the movies.

The success of the film Moonlight hints that perhaps those walls have begun to crumble, though even if true, tinsel town still has a long road to sojourn. Hollywood loves to put forward the image of celebrated diversity with award-bait movies.

The lack of openly gay performers in the movies, though, suggests real inclusion is little more than movie make-believe.

“Moonlight” Wins Best Picture In Unbelievable Upset

Review the full list of winners from the 2017 Oscars.
From: NewNowNext
 Right when it felt like Sunday night’s 89th Academy Awards ceremony was going to end without any surprises, there was a last-minute double shocker that stunned everyone—Moonlight beat out La La Land for Best Picture, but only after the movie musical’s name was mistakenly called first.

Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway first announced La La Land as the winner of the night’s biggest prize, but halfway through the producers’ acceptance speeches, a shocking twist revealed that there had been a mistake, and Moonlight was the actual winner.


 Besides the last-minute upset, most of the other predicted winners walked home with trophies, including Emma Stone’s Best Actress win for La La Land and Viola Davis’ Best Supporting Actress victory for Fences.


Check out the full list of winners below:

BEST PICTURE
Arrival
Fences
Hacksaw Ridge
Hell or High Water
Hidden Figures
La La Land
Lion
Manchester by the Sea
Moonlight (WINNER)

=============================

ACTOR IN A LEADING ROLE
Casey Affleck, Manchester by the Sea (WINNER)
Andrew Garfield, Hacksaw Ridge
Ryan Gosling, La La Land
Viggo Mortensen, Captain Fantastic
Denzel Washington, Fences

=============================

ACTRESS IN A LEADING ROLE
Isabelle Huppert, Elle
Ruth Negga, Loving
Natalie Portman, Jackie
Emma Stone, La La Land (WINNER)
Meryl Streep, Florence Foster Jenkins

=============================

ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE
Mahershala Ali, Moonlight (WINNER)
Jeff Bridges, Hell or High Water
Lucas Hedges, Manchester by the Sea
Dev Patel, Lion
Michael Shannon, Nocturnal Animals

=============================

ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE
Viola Davis, Fences (WINNER)
Naomie Harris, Moonlight
Nicole Kidman, Lion
Octavia Spencer, Hidden Figures
Michelle Williams, Manchester by the Sea

=============================

ANIMATED FEATURE FILM
Kubo and the Two Strings
Moana
My Life as a Zucchini
The Red Turtle
Zootopia (WINNER)

=============================

CINEMATOGRAPHY
Arrival
La La Land (WINNER)
Lion
Moonlight
Silence

=============================

COSTUME DESIGN
Allied
Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them (WINNER)
Florence Foster Jenkins
Jackie
La La Land

=============================

DIRECTING
Arrival
Hacksaw Ridge
La La Land (WINNER) 
Manchester by the Sea
Moonlight

=============================

DOCUMENTARY (FEATURE)
Fire at Sea
I Am Not Your Negro
Life, Animated
O.J.: Made in America (WINNER)
13th

=============================

DOCUMENTARY (SHORT SUBJECT)
Extremis
4.1 Miles
Joe’s Violin
Watani: My Homeland
The White Helmets (WINNER)

=============================

FILM EDITING
Arrival
Hacksaw Ridge (WINNER)
Hell or High Water
La La Land
Moonlight

=============================

FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM
Land of Mine
A Man Called Ove
The Salesman (WINNER)
Tanna
Toni Erdmann

=============================

MAKEUP AND HAIRSTYLING
A Man Called Ove
Star Trek Beyond
Suicide Squad (WINNER)

=============================

MUSIC (ORIGINAL SCORE)
Jackie
La La Land (WINNER)
Lion
Moonlight
Passengers

=============================

MUSIC (ORIGINAL SONG)
“Audition (The Fools Who Dream)” from La La Land
Music by Justin Hurwitz; Lyric by Benj Pasek and Justin Paul
“Can’t Stop The Feeling” from Trolls
Music and Lyric by Justin Timberlake, Max Martin and Karl Johan Schuster
“City Of Stars” from La La Land
Music by Justin Hurwitz; Lyric by Benj Pasek and Justin Paul (WINNER)
“The Empty Chair” from Jim: The James Foley Story
Music and Lyric by J. Ralph and Sting
“How Far I’ll Go” from Moana
Music and Lyric by Lin-Manuel Miranda

=============================

PRODUCTION DESIGN
Arrival
Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them
Hail, Caesar!
La La Land (WINNER)
Passengers

=============================

SHORT FILM (ANIMATED)
Blind Vaysha
Borrowed Time
Pear Cider and Cigarettes
Pearl
Piper (WINNER)

=============================

SHORT FILM (LIVE ACTION)
Ennemis IntΓ©rieurs
La Femme et le TGV
Silent Nights
Sing (WINNER) 
Timecode

=============================

SOUND EDITING
Arrival (WINNER)
Deepwater Horizon
Hacksaw Ridge
La La Land
Sully

=============================

SOUND MIXING
Arrival
Hacksaw Ridge (WINNER)
La La Land
Rogue One: A Star Wars Story
13 Hours: The Secret Soldiers of Benghazi

=============================

VISUAL EFFECTS
Deepwater Horizon
Doctor Strange
The Jungle Book (WINNER)
Kubo and the Two Strings
Rogue One: A Star Wars Story

=============================

WRITING (ADAPTED SCREENPLAY)
Arrival
Fences
Hidden Figures
Lion
Moonlight (WINNER)

=============================

WRITING (ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY)
Hell or High Water
La La Land
The Lobster
Manchester by the Sea (WINNER) 
20th Century Women

Welcome To My Private Grotto

From: Brent's Auto Walls

“Moonlight” Takes Home Oscar For Best Adapted Screenplay

"We have your back, and for the next four years...we will not forget you."
From: NewNowNext
Director Barry Jenkins and original playwright Tarell Alvin McCraney accepted the Oscar for Best Adapted Screenplay on Sunday for turning McCraney’s play, In Moonlight Black Boys Look Blue, into a feature film.

The movie tells the three-part story of Chiron, a poor gay black man coming to terms with his sexual identity while growing up in Florida.

Both men used their Oscars speeches to offer hope and gratitude to disenfranchised viewers.

“All you people out there who feel like there’s no mirror for you, that your life is not reflected—the Academy has your back, the ACLU has your back, we have your back, and for the next four years, we will not leave you alone,” promised Jenkins. “We will not forget you.”

McCraney doubled down on the director’s sentiments with a special dedication.

“This goes out to all those black and brown boys and girls and non-gender conforming who don’t see themselves,” the playwright said. “This is for you.”

“Moonlight” Stars Dazzle In New Calvin Klein Underwear Campaign

"Everything I’ve wished for is happening.”
From: NewNowNext
Moonlight made history as the first LGBT-themed movie to win Best Picture at the Academy Awards. Now the film’s stars are giving us even more of a reason to celebrate: Trevante Rhodes, Ashton Sanders and Mahershala Ali are appearing in an eye catching new campaign for Calvin Klein Underwear.

 We expect to hear a lot more from these handsome men: Ali, of course, took home the Best Supporting Actor award last night and 27-year-old Rhodes, a former track and field sprinter, is shooting two big-budget action films back-to-back—Horse Soldiers and a reboot of the Predator franchise.


 The shoot also had 21-year-old Sanders modeling his CK briefs, and 12-year-old Alex R. Hibbert, who played Chiron as a child, keeping it cool in a black t-shirt.





 “I’m a very spiritual person, but I’m realizing I have to be careful what I put out there,” Sanders confesses, “because everything I’ve wished for is happening.”






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